John O'Meara

Shakespearean, neo-Romantic critic

John O'Meara Shakespeare Shakespearean Romanticism Literary Critic Novalis

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JOHN O’MEARA is the author of numerous publications on Shakespeare, Romanticism, and Modernity. Otherworldly Hamlet/Othello’s Sacrifice/Prospero’s Powers, three short studies elaborated from a neo-Romantic point of view, were followed by the trilogy On Nature and the Goddess in Romantic and post-Romantic Literature, incorporating further studies on Romantic and modern authors. A partial synthesis of this wide spectrum of studies appeared concurrently with this latter Trilogy, under the title Shakespeare, the Goddess, and Modernity. This collection features still more of O’Meara’s Shakespeare work, including his original views on Shakespeare’s association with Martin Luther.              

John O'Meara Shakespearean

Born in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, John O’Meara received his Ph.D in 1986 from the University of East Anglia, Norwich, England. He taught in numerous capacities, for many years, at McGill University, Concordia University, the Université Laval, the University of Toronto and,  most recently, the University of Ottawa.

 

O’Meara’s essays have appeared in a number of collections on Shakespeare including Postmodern Essays on Love, Sex, and Marriage in Shakespeare (2008), and Shakespeare the Man: New Decipherings (2014).

 

He has also written Defending Her Son (1999),  a memoir that recounts the early events of his life through and beyond the publication of Otherworldly Hamlet and Othello’s Sacrifice

 

On Defending Her Son:

the elegance of the prose is both gratifying and intriguing ... particularly because it seems to come from an earlier era, not only the rhythms and diction…but also the sentiments, the romantic positioning of the authorial voice, which seems untouched by the candour, abrasiveness and discontinuity of the final days of the second millenium.

[A] terrific memoir in so many ways.” 

{ Gary Geddes, author of Sailing Home and The Kingdom of Ten Thousand Things }